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You are here: Home Volume IX January 2010 Editorial: January 2010

Editorial: January 2010

By Terry Siegel Posted Jan 14, 2010 07:00 PM Pomacanthus Publications, Inc.
Terry discusses all the articles in this month's issue along with a bit more about his freshwater aquarium.

The first thing is to wish all of our readers and sponsors a Happy New Year, and to say that with this issue of the New Year some of the best content ever.

Dana Riddle begins the year with Part 1 of a series on the multitude of organisms that can and do parasitize corals, entitled Stony Coral Parasites: Copepods, Not Just Red Bugs.

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The parasitic copepod Kombia angulata, a species found on or in stony corals Psammocora and Porites. Drawing by the Dana Riddle.

Ken Feldman continues his ground breaking study of protein skimmers, exploring what they actually do, and which type is most efficient at this work. His new study is entitled, Further Studies on Protein Skimmer Performance.

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A generic skimmer with all mathematical quantities defined.

I might add that Ken has already submitted a paper to be published here next month on an analysis of what is actually in skimmate.

Sanjay Joshi continues his measurements of illumination devices for reef aquariums, a study that I might add that is as thorough as it is accurate.

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Jake Adams article focuses on two of the major reef concerns of the past year: water flow and illumination.

As for myself I continue to work on my freshwater planted aquarium. I have added more light and CO2. So much for trying to stay low tech. Anyone who thinks that maintaining a planted freshwater aquarium is easier and requires less work than a coral reef tank is fooling themselves. I also wish to thank all those experienced freshwater folks that have written to me offering their advice. Following are some recent photos of my freshwater aquarium.

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This beautiful fish is commonly called the red lined torpedo barb. It was originally classified as Barbus denisonii, but has been reclassified as Puntius denisonii. This fish is indiginous to Kerala in South India.

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