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Natural zebrafish outcompete Glofish for mates

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Researchers found that wild male zebrafish consistently beat out genetically modified Glofish for potential mates. Females wanted to mate with Glofish males, but wild males prevented it. Evolution is usually thought of in terms of "survival of the fittest, but the study shows that mating success is actually a stronger driving force.

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Fish born in larger groups develop more social skills and a different brain structure

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Fishkeepers have observed that captive-bred fish tend to be more sociable and less aggressive than their wild counterparts. A new research provides a possible explanation why.

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Octopus peek-a-boo

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There is an amusing video making its rounds of an underwater photographer trying to snap a picture of an uncooperative Hawaiian octopus. There is an obvious reason why so many people ♥ octopus.

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The Golden Passer Angelfish

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Meet El Dorado, the incredible amelanistic Holacanthus passer. This angelfish is virtually devoid of melanin, leaving it with only the brilliant golden coloration of its carotenoid pigments.

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New research reveals first warm-blooded fish

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New research by NOAA Fisheries has revealed the opah, or moonfish, as the first fully warm-blooded fish that circulates heated blood throughout its body much like mammals and birds, giving it a competitive advantage in the cold ocean depths.

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The Blue Moon crayfish finally has a name

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The Cherax "Blue Moon" (AKA Hoa Creek) crayfish is one of the most beautiful tropical freshwater crustaceans. It started showing up in the aquarium trade circa early 2000s, but no one knew much about its origins. Scientists have finally located this crayfish in the wild and determined it is a new species: Cherax pulcher.

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Fish can produce their own sunscreen

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A new research has discovered that fish (at least zebrafish) are able to produce their own sunscreen when bombarded with UV light. Scientists want to learn if this discovery has human application. Regardless, we think it's neato that our fish friends can protect themselves from UV.

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ARTICLE

Decreased growth of Stylophora pistillata with nutrient-driven elevated zooxanthellae density is largely explained by DIC limitation

By Alwin Hylkema (ab*), Tim Wijgerde (a*), Ronald Osinga on May 13, 2015 at 10:00 AM

High nutrient concentrations are generally known to adversely affect coral calcification. This reduction in calcification rate is often associated with increased zooxanthellae densities, but little is known about the mechanism underlying calcification inhibition. In this study, we assessed the limiting effects of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) on growth rates of Stylophora pistillata before and after five weeks of nitrogen and phosphorus enrichment. Nutrient enrichment resulted in a significant increase in zooxanthellae density and inhibition of calcification, measured using the alkalinity anomaly technique. DIC limitation was the main causative factor for this inhibition; a doubling of the bicarbonate concentration not only restored but greatly enhanced calcification rates of colonies with elevated zooxanthellae densities. At high bicarbonate concentration, no significant negative effect of nutrient enrichment on coral growth was found. The causal mechanism behind calcification inhibition due to nutrient enrichment is most likely increased competition for dissolved inorganic carbon, either among the zooxanthellae or between the coral host and its symbiotic dinoflagellates. This highly limiting effect of DIC on coral growth at elevated nutrient concentrations has important implications for coral aquaculture and husbandry.

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The power of driftwood to lead the eye

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Here are two beautiful aquascapes featuring gnarly driftwood projecting from both sides of the tank towards the middle to frame and add a lot of "movement" to their composition.

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Chrysiptera caesifrons: A new reef damselfish

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Chrysiptera caesifrons is the newest Pomacentrid species. What's most remarkable about the damselfish isn't its appearance or behavior but rather how wide its natural range is and that it has only now been described.

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Feeding Acropora helps them handle elevated temperatures and CO2

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A new research by the UM Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science finds that staghorn corals fed dried zooplankton were able to sustain normal growth at elevated temperatures and CO2. Studies like this further reinforce the importance of coral nutrition in the wild and in captivity - a subject Advanced Aquarist has covered extensively in recent months.

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This crazy pleco can scale vertical walls!

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Loricariids aren't known for death-defying antics; fact is, they live a very unexciting sedentary lifestyle. But this pleco, Chaetostoma microps, was recorded climbing up and down a vertical wall in an Ecuadorian cave ... using its sucker-mouth!

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ARTICLE

Coral Nutrition, Part Three: Amino Acids and Comments on Amino Acid Supplements

By Dana Riddle on May 06, 2015 at 09:00 AM

Dana Riddle continues his intensive exploration of coral nutrition. In part three of his series, he delves deep into the subject of amino acids, including a discussion about amino acid supplements marketed to reefkeepers.

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A crab that burrows in your brain has been identified

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Sorry for the click-bait title. We couldn't resist. A new species of gall crabs that lives inside open brain corals, Trachyphyllia geoffroyi, has just been described.

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A new twilight zone anthias from Pohnpei

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Luzonichthys seaver is a newest described anthias hailing from very deep waters at Pohnepei, Micronesia. No photo of a living specimen currently exists, but the preserved holotype shows a supremely colorful fish, which many super deep water reef fish are.

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