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Into the DNA of a Coral Reef Predator

By Wilko Duprez, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology on Apr 17, 2017 at 09:00 AM

New research, published in Nature, brings a trove of new information to potentially control the invasive species. A collaboration of OIST and Australian scientists sequenced the entire COTS genome for the first time.

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A new tetra fish from Columbia

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Hyphessobrycon klausanni is the newest described tetra species. It appears most closely related (at least superficially) to other tetras in the Hyphessobrycon agulha-group, which share the common trait of possessing dark longitudinal stripes.

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Some tangs aren't very good at eating algae

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Most marine aquarists think of all tangs as herbivores, so they add any tang they prefer to their aquariums to control algae. And while it is true that the vast majority of tangs are algae-eaters, a new study finds that some tangs (in the case of the study, Ctenochaetus striatus) are really detrivores.

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Global coral reef restoration effort launches in the Caribbean

By SECORE International on Apr 12, 2017 at 09:00 AM

SECORE International, the California Academy of Sciences and The Nature Conservancy join forces to implement larger-scale coral restoration.

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The formula for fangblenny venom revealed

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Fangblennies of the genus Meiacanthus are popular reef fish kept by marine aquarists. We've long known their fangs pack venom (used primarily as defense), but until this year, we had no idea what was in that venom. A new study discovers it is a complex and elegant drug cocktail.

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A new deep-sea jawfish

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Opistognathus schrieri is a new Caribbean species of jawfish currently only known from Curaçao. Specimens were collected from sand beds at the crushing depth of about 152 m (500 ft).

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When neighbors don't get along

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A poor blue-spotted jawfish is just trying to remodel his house, but a punk diamond goby doesn't approve of the construction. A little clownfish bears witness to an epic sand fight.

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New vermetid snail found in Florida may have originated from the Pacific

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Thylacodes vandyensis is a newly described species of vermetid snail that was found on a Floridian shipwreck. Vermetids are worm-like snails that cast mucus nets. They are often found warm Indo-Pacific reefs and are regularly aquarium pests hitchhiked on live rock. Now they may pose an invasive problem in the Atlantic.

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A new Cory!

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Technically a new Corydoradinae, not Corydoras: Aspidoras kiriri is a new species of armored catfish that is found in small streams of the Atlantic Forest, Southeast Brazil (not the Amazon).

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A new Amazonian pleco

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Aphanotorulus rubrocauda is a new Loricariid species from the Amazon River, Brazil. Its most prominent feature is its strikingly long, forked, red caudal fin — hence its latin name rubro (red) + cauda (tail).

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Innovative Marine launches NUVO Peninsula series

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IM's new NUVO Peninsula all-in-one (AIO) aquarium systems place the filter compartment on one of the far sides of the long aquarium to allow placements where other AIOs would not be suited for. The Peninsula series features all the bells and whistles that IM AIOs are known for.

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Using the world's most powerful x-ray on coral skeletons

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Like tree rings and ice cores can tell us a lot about the history of the physical world, studying coral skeletons using powerful x-rays can reveal an impressive amount of information. Did you know stony corals absorb less strontium when it is warmer?

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Mantaray Island, Fiji, is a magical place

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Many reefkeepers have never had the chance to visit the exotic reefs some of their fish and corals come from. We hope everyone reading this has the opportunity some day. Mantaray Island in Fiji is a poster-child for a healthy coral reef in all its splendor.

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Bobbit worms really are the stuff of nightmares

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Bobbit worms (Eunice aphroditois) are about as terrifying a worm as you'll ever see. These predatory worms can grow to scary length - over 2 meters/6 feet - and pack toxins to immobilize their prey. And yes, they've been known to hitchhike on live rock.

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Google really understands perks

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Google is famous for fostering the ideal work-space to motivate their employees. As if free gourmet food, massages, a gaming room, nap pods, and a state-of-the-art gym aren't enough, the employees of Google Munich get to relax in this room.

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