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By admin - Posted Oct 26, 2009 09:10 PM

Man cooks and eats flowerhorn cichlid

Man cooks and eats flowerhorn cichlid

Stir-fried flowerhorn

If you are a cichlid keeper/lover, be forewarned you may find this article unsettling. A Malaysian man posts photos and a video of him cleaning and stir-frying a spectacular mature flowerhorn cichlid for dinner.

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Female fish prefer average active lovers

Female fish prefer average active lovers

Gambusia holbrooki

In evolution, a high sex drive does not always pay off. Female mosquitofish swim away from over-impetuous lovers because they leave them hardly any time to feed and also tend to injure their genitalia more often.

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Trump could reduce or eliminate eleven marine reserves

Trump could reduce or eliminate eleven marine reserves

The status of Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (pictured) is under threat. Photo by NOAA.

We've refrained from wading into American politics, but this proposed executive order could have far reaching consequences for marine conservation. From Monterey Bay to Hawaii, New England to American Samoa, Trump's proposed order could reduce or eliminate marine reserves to pave way for oil exploration and drilling.

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This new hermit crab is a lovely weirdo

This new hermit crab is a lovely weirdo

The "shells" of Paragiopagurus atkinsonaeis is custom-built for them by zoanthids (which are unfortunately dead in this photo).

Most hermit crabs use shells built by evicted gastropods (e.g. snails) for protection, but not this new green-eyed species. The "shells" of Paragiopagurus atkinsonaeis are actually permanent colonies of zoanthids who glue together sand into a non-calcified armor, so these "living shells" grow with the hermit crab!

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Christian Gundersen's Glimmer Wood aquascape

Here is a elegant 50 liter (30 US gallon) aquascape to soothe the soul. Its balanced scale and vibrant pops of complimentary colors (red with green) set against the muted grey canvas are simply perfect.

Scientists name new species of fish from the Orinoco region after singer Enya

Scientists name new species of fish from the Orinoco region after singer Enya

Leporinus enyae

In 1988, Irish singer and songwriter Enya released a lead single titled “Orinoco Flow” from her second studio album, which went on to become an international hit, earn a Grammy Award nomination, and help launch her wildly successful career. Now a team of scientists have named a new species of fish from the Orinoco River drainage after her.

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Bleached your coral? Increase water movement!

Bleached your coral?  Increase water movement!

A bleached "Christmas Tree" Porites coral. Photo by Matt Kieffer.

A new study found that bleached corals are three to FIFTEEN times less capable of removing sediment (e.g. detritus, algae) from their surfaces compared to healthy corals. To prevent sediment from smothering a bleached coral, water movement is paramount.

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Deep-water corals use fluorescence differently than shallow-water corals

Deep-water corals use fluorescence differently than shallow-water corals

The fluorescence of Ricordea sp.

A new study has discovered that corals emit bio-fluorescence for very different purposes depending on how deep they are found. While shallow-water corals glow to protect themselves from sun damage, deep-water corals use their glow for energy.

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Fish prefer to shoal with active companions

Fish prefer to shoal with active companions

Minnows in respirometry chambers. Credit: Ms Anna Persson

Scientists discovered that fish like to associate with other fish that are more active. The researchers originally hypothesized that fish may prefer to be in the presence of less active fish to reduce competition for food and mates, but they found quite the opposite.

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A new Mexican cichlid

A new Mexican cichlid

A juvenile male Thorichthys panchovillai collected from Almoloya River, El Ajal.

Thorichthys panchovillai is a new species described from the River Coatzacoalcos Basin, Mexico. As with many new species that have been recently described, this species is already in the aquarium trade.

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The strangest reef aquascape ever?

Gorgeous rainbow open brain corals! An incredible, healthy green Stichodactyla Gigantea carpet anemone hosting a pair of percula clownfish. But will someone please explain the aquascaping?

Tenji builds Amazon.com a jaw-dropping planted aquarium system

There is no way to exaggerate how breathtaking Tenji's new design is. Amazon.com's Seattle building is graced with the most immaculate and beautiful planted office aquarium (with "living wall") display we can imagine.

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Just a seahorse riding a pipefish

Just a seahorse riding a pipefish

Mount up!

Pipefish camouflage as seaweed. Seahorse like to anchor their prehensile tails on seaweed. Do the math and you get this hilariously adorable result :-)

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Update: Paul's magnificent sunroom reef

Update: Paul's magnificent sunroom reef

Paul's mega-reef in 2013

Paul Bruns' 427 reef aquarium is one of the best we've ever featured in Advanced Aquarist. Three years later, Paul shares a new video discussing how his reef system has evolved and matured.

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Loud motor noise makes fish bad parents

Loud motor noise makes fish bad parents

Photograph by Naoaki Okamura

A new study has found that the sound from motorboats radically decreased reef fishes' parenting skills - sometimes to the point of total neglect and the mortality of all babies. Research like should make reefkeepers question how much motor noise in our tanks does it take to create adverse behavior and well-being.

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