Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools
Log in
Sections
You are here: Home Blog He is hooked on ocean life

He is hooked on ocean life

By Shane Graber - Posted Jul 24, 2012 11:00 AM
Vincent Monk is hooked on ocean life - literally. Using tuna fish hooks, Vincent fashions amazing oceanic art: various species of sharks and sea turtles all come alive from the careful placement of simple fish hooks.
He is hooked on ocean life

Great hammerhead shark made from tuna fish hooks.

Vincent chose his medium with care. Longer ago, fish hooks symbolized our intimate connection with nature with fish hooks found as far back as 42,000 years ago in East Timor. Today, to Vincent fish hooks symbolize the ravaging of the world's oceans using long line fishhooks in unregulated international waters.

According to the artist's website:

With his sculptures, Vincent explores the relationship between our identity as a human species and our place on this planet. The increasing number of endangered species suggests that we have become disconnected from nature and misguided about our responsibilities towards our natural environment. This neglect is none more evident than within the shark family. For more than 400 million years, sharks have determined the natural balance in the oceans as apex predators, dominating the water even before life on land flourished, and being a crucial part of the selection process for life of the future. Now these ancient, iconic fish are in danger of becoming extinct.

Vincent crafts these predators in their pure organic shape out of the very fishhooks that are threatening their existence, hoping to draw awareness to our place within and responsibility towards nature.

Take a look at some of the awe-inspiring sculptures that Vincent has wrought:

A hammerhead shark.
A hammerhead shark.

Top view of the hammerhead shark sculpture.
Top view of the hammerhead shark sculpture.

Side view.
Side view.

An example of the mesh of hooks that Vincent creates.
An example of the mesh of hooks that Vincent creates.

For every 1000 hooks set at Cocos Island, 10-14 turtles are caught.
For every 1000 hooks set at Cocos Island, 10-14 turtles are caught.

A sea turtle.
A sea turtle.

(via Project Aware)

Author: Shane Graber
Location: Indiana

Shane has kept saltwater tanks for the last 12 years, is a research scientist, lives in northern Indiana, and is a proud Advanced Aquarist staffer.

Website: http://www.advancedaquarist.com/.

Document Actions
Filed under: , ,
blog comments powered by Disqus

blog_sm.jpg

Contribute to our blogs!


Do you have news or discussion topics you want to see blogged?  Let us know!

 

ADVANCED AQUARIST