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By admin - Posted Oct 26, 2009 09:10 PM

How much is GloFish worth?

How much is GloFish worth?

GloFish

Yorktown Technologies LP has sold their brand, GloFish to Spectrum Brands for approximately $50 million in cash plus incentives. GloFish are genetically engineered fluorescent "designer" tropical fish that are marketed to aquarists (where legal).

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A better understanding of sex-changing fish

A better understanding of sex-changing fish

A tale of two sexes

Sequential hermaphroditism is a fairly rare thing ... unless you're a reef fish. From clownfish and damselfish to angelfish and wrasses, a new study explores the dynamics and implications of fish that can change sexes.

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Man guilty of smuggling $1mil worth of illegal live coral

Man guilty of smuggling $1mil worth of illegal live coral

(Above) Ricordea polyps on reef substrate seized from defendant.

A Puerto Rican aquarium shop owner pled guilty of two federal Lacey Act felonies for the illicit trafficking of protected ricordea, zoanthid, and anemones over the span of three years with an estimated value of $800,000 to $1,200,000.

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How do reef fish recognize toxic prey?

How do reef fish recognize toxic prey?

Goniobranchus splendidus. Photo by Steve Clay

This gaudily colored nudibranch is toxic, and triggerfishes know it. But what markings on this nudibranch signal to fishes it is toxic? It's not what you may think. Here's a hint: Consistency matters.

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Three new crayfish species found in the Bluegrass State

Three new big, beautiful crayfish species are described from neighboring streams found in the Kentucky Appalachians. Anyone up for an Appalachian crayfish biotope aquarium?

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Goldfish can create alcohol to survive without oxygen

Goldfish can create alcohol to survive without oxygen

Goldfish are worldclass survivors ... thanks to alcohol.

Goldfish are renowned for their hardiness. New research discovers the secret behind how goldfish can survive months in frigid and oxygen-less water: goldfish possess the unique ability to convert lactic acid (which can build up to deadly levels in the absence of oxygen) into ethanol.

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Five new Grallenia reef gobies

Say hello to the five new reef goby species from the western Pacific Ocean: Grallenia compta, Grallenia dimorpha, Grallenia lauensis, Grallenia rubrilineata, and Grallenia solomonensis.

Grallenia_comparison.jpg

The five new Grallenia gobies were all discovered living on sandy bottom habitats. Prior to the formal description of these gobies, the genus Grallenia only had three recognized species.  The first species, Grallenia lipi, was described in 2007.  These gobies are hard to spot because all known Grallenia are tiny (less than 2.5cm/1 inch) and camouflage extremely well against the sandy/silty substrate.

G. rubrilineata is currently known from the Philippines, G. compta and G. dimorpha from Papua New Guinea, and G. lauensis and G. solomonensis from Fiji and the Solomon Islands.  They share similar physical traits from one another and are differentiated by minor differences in coloration, scale pattern, dorsal fin-ray count, and/or dorsal fin shape.

Grallenia_dimorpha.jpg

Grallenia dimorpha, above, exhibits the greatest sexual dimorphism of the five new species, hence its etymology.  Males (top photo) have squarish front dorsal fins with striped pigmentation running the entire length while females (bottom photo) have clear-colored fins with a triangular front dorsal.

Grallenia_rubrilineata_Trio.jpg

Pictured above is a "family" of Grallenia rubrilineata: juvenile (left), female (center), and male (right).  As can be seen, this species also has pronounced sexual dimorphism like G. dimorpha.

The new gobies are described in the Journal of the Ocean Science Foundation.

Aquatic Life Debuts its Classic RO/DI Series

What is old is new again. Aquatic Life improves the classic, time-tested reverse osmosis design. Their new Classic Series is one of the cleanest iteration of the classic RO/DI form factor we have seen.

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Should reefkeepers strive for quieter aquariums?

Should reefkeepers strive for quieter aquariums?

How does equipment noise effect our reef fish?

A clearer picture is painted with a growing body of research: noise pollution impacts the health and behavior of marine fish. Should marine aquarists pay more attention to noise levels within their aquariums?

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Aquacultured sea cucumbers are now available

Los Angeles wholesaler Quality Marine received their first aquacultured Caledonian Sand Sifting Cucumber (Holothuria fuscopunctata). Cukes may not be the most glamorous animal, but any new aquacultured marine species takes pressure off wild reefs and deserves the star treatment.

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Thief makes off with 50 bags of aquacultured tropical fish

Thief makes off with 50 bags of aquacultured tropical fish

The aquaculture vats at V W Tropical Fish

A masked woman is recorded on hidden camera stealing an estimated $15,000 to $20,000 worth of cichlids, angelfish, and kois from V W Tropical Fish farm in Lakeland, Florida.

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Baby cichlids exercise their jaws to change their faces!

When you zoom in on baby Malawi cichlids, you'll see them constantly opening and closing their mouths at lightning speed. It's a strange behavior, and now scientists have discovered its purpose. The baby fish are actually exercising their jaws to promote bone formation and ultimately shaping their mouths.

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Birds feeding fishes is a real thing

There are a lot of really fascinating videos of birds (of all feathers) feeding pond fish. Why do birds do this? Some animal behaviorists hypothesize these birds might see fish mouth as baby bird mouths, so their parental instinct kicks in. Whatever the reason, it's really cute.

This black-headed cardinal is said to return to the pond up to six times a day just to feed the koi!

As if baby ducks aren't cute enough ...

Yup; a black swan feeding fish.  Check that off your bucket list.  Warning: Hideous electronic music!

Nicholas' 360g reef is REALLY filling in nicely

After a mere nine months, Nicholas Liu's 360 gallon (72x40x24 inch) reef tank is already shaping up to be a world-class aquarium.

(Note: The video lacks audio)

I'm a sucker for anemones in reef tanks, so seeing multiple healthy carpet anemones (Stichodactyla gigantea) swaying in Nicolas' reef really put a smile on my face. It's fair to debate whether collecting carpet anemones for captivity is conscientious, but you can't debate that Nicolas' anemones are thriving in his aquarium.

Oh yeah ... there's also some really nice corals and fish (hello, Interruptus angelfishes) in there, too. Cool

The video below shows Nicholas' aquarium a few weeks after it was started in late 2016. The transformation in nine short months is truly remarkable. I marvel at how quickly some people's reefs can mature (I've never had such success in my 30 years reefkeeping).  From the SPS to the anemones, the tank appears to be on steroids.

Male livebearing fish are evolving faster than females

Male livebearing fish are evolving faster than females

Samples of fish species from the Poeciliidae family show the diversity in color, fin size and body shape. Kansas State University researchers studied 112 species of these live-bearing fishes and found that males and females evolve differently.

Girls might MATURE more quickly than boys when it comes to humans. But scientists have discovered the male livebearing fish (e.g. guppies, mollies, platies, swordtails) EVOLVE more quickly than females.

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ADVANCED AQUARIST