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Noise makes it hard for fish to school

By Leonard Ho - Posted Sep 29, 2017 09:00 AM
Marine aquarists have all experienced it: Reef fishes that naturally school simply refuse to in captivity? Common theories are that the lack of predators or the relatively small size of aquariums discourage schooling. A new study finds that noise plays a big role. Noisy water = less cohesive schooling.
Noise makes it hard for fish to school

A school of Pterapogon kauderni

From the University of Bristol:


Noise pollution found to be disruptive for schooling fish

Human activities, like spreading cities, transport and construction, generate a lot of noise that travels faster in water than in air.

But cohesion and coordination in fish schools are essential in helping some animals avoid predators and exchange information socially.

Recordings of pile-driving, used in the construction of marine infrastructure like windfarms and piers, were played back to small schools of seabass.

450 individual fish were tested in shoals of four individuals each, in the aquarium at the University of Bristol.

The fish became less cohesive and coordinated during the playbacks, compared to when only normal ambient sea sounds were played to them.

Dr Christos Ioannou from the University's School of Biological Sciences, said: "By using state-of-the-art computer tracking software, we were able to measure and analyse the movement of individual fish and the shoal as a whole in great detail.

"This is one of the few studies to explore how pollution from human activity impacts schooling behaviour in fish.

"Previous work has mostly focused on the effect of noise on the physiology and behaviour of individual animals."

The changes in the fish's behaviour when exposed to noise suggests they may be more susceptible to predators, as schooling behaviour is so useful in avoiding being eaten.

 


Journal Reference:

  1. James E. Herbert-Read, Louise Kremer, Rick Bruintjes, Andrew N. Radford, Christos C. Ioannou. Anthropogenic noise pollution from pile-driving disrupts the structure and dynamics of fish shoals. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2017; 284 (1863): 20171627 DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2017.1627

Author: Leonard Ho
Location: Southern California

I'm a passionate aquarist of over 30 years, a coral reef lover, and the blog editor for Advanced Aquarist. While aquarium gadgets interest me, it's really livestock (especially fish), artistry of aquariums, and "method behind the madness" processes that captivate my attention.

Website: http://www.advancedaquarist.com.

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