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Waldorf Astoria Maldives begins coral reef restoration program

By Shane Graber - Posted Dec 22, 2011 07:00 AM
The Waldorf Astoria located on the northernmost Maldives atoll has begun a reef restoration program in their area. They have partnered with Seamarc, a marine consultancy firm, and now allow guests to help build new reef structures and restore damaged reefs through their new partnership.
Waldorf Astoria Maldives begins coral reef restoration program

Seamarc developed a new artificial reef system, the “coral trays”.

When I first read about this program, I thought it sounded very similar to the one I blogged about last week called Adopt-a-Coral as it shares a number of similar features.

Waldorf Astoria Maldives has partnered with Seamarc, a Maldives marine consultancy firm. According to their website, they have been involved in a number of marine conservancy projects that include Reef Ball, erosion control, environmental impact assessments, and the like. In this particular instance, Seamarc will be using a system they developed called "coral trays" for the transplantation project with the Waldorf Astoria. According to Seamarc, their trays "improve the resistance to predation and avoid sedimentation, while providing a suitable substrate for the [coral] fragments." Example photos of their "coral trays" can be seen above.

For $150, guests can select and transplant a small portion of coral reef in the area surrounding the resort. The whole process takes one hour, and involves selecting a plot of living but damaged or threatened coral that has been harvested by Seamarc, attaching the plot to a lightweight frame structure, and transplanting it in the resort's lagoon. Guests can then monitor the growth and progress of their coral reef plot through a dedicated website.

Whether the Waldorf Astoria Maldives is doing this strictly for altruistic or self-indulgent reasons, it is definitely a step in the right direction.

(via Gadling)

Author: Shane Graber
Location: Indiana

Shane has kept saltwater tanks for the last 12 years, is a research scientist, lives in northern Indiana, and is a proud Advanced Aquarist staffer.


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