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By admin - Posted Oct 26, 2009 09:10 PM

Vandals poison LFS coral tanks with copper

Vandals who are clearly knowledgeable about coral biology have reportedly poisoned the holding tanks at Saltwater Fanta-seas (a LFS in Portland, Oregon) by pouring a copper solution into their system.

The local newscast reports the destroyed livestock was valued up to $40,000, although I suspect this value is inflated for sensationalism.  Whatever their value, this is yet another senseless and despicable act perpetrated on innocent animals.  Unconfirmed reports suggest similar vandalism have occurred multiple times in the Pacific Northwest and elsewhere across the country.  LFS are cautioned to remain vigilant and use security cameras.

Waveline DC-5000 pump, unboxed & reviewed

Waveline DC-5000 pump, unboxed & reviewed

The Waveline DC-5000 pump and controller

We unbox and review the new Waveline DC-5000 pump by H20 Systems. The DC-5000 is a speed-controllable direct current circulation pump rated for 5,000lph (1320gph) at only 40 watts. Does it live up to its billing?

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Razor clams burrow into the sand by fluidizing it

Razor clams burrow into the sand by fluidizing it

Razor clam shells on the beach. Photo by Arne Hückelheim, Wikimedia Commons.

Razor clams have the ability to burrow up to 30 inches into the sand yet data on the clams' "muscle power" shows that it should not have the strength to burrow deeper than 1 inch. How is it able to dig that deep with its "limited" abilities?

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Innovative Marine releases new Skkyelight Dimmable Dual Strip LED Fixture

Innovative Marine, a company known for their aesthetically appealing all-in-one aquariums, has released a new LED system: The Skkyelight Dimmable Dual Strip LED.

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Vancouver Aquarium's baby opalescent squids

Vancouver Aquarium began rearing close to 400 opalescent squid (Doryteuthis opalescens) paralarvae in March, 2012. They have posted a spectacular video of a tiny baby squid. Keep in mind the baby you see is the size of a rice grain!

The amazing macro video demonstrates the unique locomotion of squids.  Fins steer and stabilize the squid as jet propulsion launches it to its destination.  And the tiny dark spots you see ... they're individual chromatophores (color-changing pigment cells) the squid will learn to use as it matures.

Read more about their new opalescent squids on the Vancouver Aquarium blog.

Seraya Fangblenny, a potential new species

Seraya Fangblenny, a potential new species

A potential new Flag Blenny of the genus Petroscirtes. © Ned DeLoach (shared with permission)

The ocean is filled with animals we have yet to discover ... even in the shallow tropical seas of Bali, Indonesia. Ned DeLoach captures images of an undescribed Petroscirtes sp. fangblenny.

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Even deep sea vehicles can transfer non-native species to new sites

Even deep sea vehicles can transfer non-native species to new sites

The deep sea submarine, ALVIN, operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Deep sea vehicles like the Alvin submarine are invaluable tools for researching deep sea sites like hydrothermal vents. However, if not properly cleaned they can inadvertently transfer non-native species between dive sites as scientists have just discovered.

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More Memorial Day Wreck Reef Diving

Reef life will seemingly congregate on any hard substrate. In the Red Sea, corals, anemones, and fish make homes out of a sunken anti-aircraft tank (yes, TANK!) and a giant British ship. In Hawaii, free-divers visit the artificial reef of a WWII fighter plane.

We'll be back tomorrow with more aquarist news and articles. In the meantime, we hope you enjoy exploring more of the world's undersea wonders with us.  Today's video playlist stars the artificial coral reefs of a Jordanian M42 Duster anti-aircraft tank, British SS Thistlegorm merchant ship, and USN Vought F4U Corsair.

Destination Reefs: USAT Liberty shipwreck at Tulamben, Bali Indonesia

The United States celebrates Memorial Day tomorrow - a day to remember the fallen. There isn't a more fitting destination this week than the wreck of WWII naval ship Liberty. Her story doesn't end in devastation; Living coral gardens now decorate her steel haul.

The US transport ship was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine in 1942, beached at Bali, and finally dislodged by a volcanic eruption in 1963 when she drifted to her final underwater resting place off the coast of Tulamben (Bali, Indoensia).  It's amazing to see how many reef organisms now embrace a sunken war relic as their home.

Video by Lachie Smith.  The underwater footage begins at 1:40.

Amazing carrier crab shield defense [video]

Sulawesi, Indonesia: Watch an ingenious carrier crab carry a spiny sea urchin and use it as a shield from predators.

Video: NatGeo

Sumida nature aquariums by Amano

ADA shares a video of two completed giant nature aquariums at Sumida Aquarium. Although the video is in Japanese, the breathtaking imagery transcends language barriers. Takashi Amano never ceases to impress.

Earlier in the week, we shared another ADA video (English version) describing the extensive design and build process for the nature aquarium exhibits at the newly opened Sumida Aquarium in the Tokyo Sky Tree Town complex.  Here is the finished results of Amano's work.  Brace yourself for awesomeness.

Dutch Room Divider Coral Reef Aquarium

Dutch Room Divider Coral Reef Aquarium

Rustic contemporary chic

Niels Ketelaar from the Netherlands shared his beautiful 250 liter (65 gallon) room-divider aquarium with our friends at 3reef.com. His system marries warm wood-panel cabinetry, cool contemporary canopy, and living reef to create an unique architectural centerpiece.

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Friday Flashback: Blastomussa wellsi Photo Showcase

Friday Flashback: Blastomussa wellsi Photo Showcase

The gorgeous B.wellsi of 'Breakin-Newz'

Originally published May 19, 2011: (Not for the bandwidth-challenged!) Here are photos of spectacular Blastomussa wellsi corals from members of Reef2Reef.com. I think it's safe to say: B.wellsi rivals any coral species for exotic colors and patterns.

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Tubastrea farming at the Steinhart Aquarium

Tubastrea farming at the Steinhart Aquarium

Photo by Rich Ross

A 200 gallon exhibit at the California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium has proven to be quite effective at producing captive grown Tubastrea colonies via asexual budding of parent colonies. Although captive reproduction of Tubastrea has been documented since at least 1993 when Joe Yaiullo wrote about it, we hope these images inspire some folks to try their hand at a simple method for captively propagating these corals en masse for the aquarium hobby.

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How sediment kills corals

How sediment kills corals

© M. Weber/HYDRA Institute/Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, mweber@hydra-institute.com

Sedimentation due to terrestrial runoff or from large storms like tsunamis can have drastic affects on corals, leading in many cases to "rapid coral death by deadly chain reaction" if the sediment is not removed promptly.

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