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By admin - Posted Oct 26, 2009 09:10 PM

A new killifish species has all the colors of the rainbow

A new killifish species has all the colors of the rainbow

Anablepsoides chapare

Can we call this the skittles killifish? Anablepsoides chapare is a new killifish species from the Amazon. Red, blue, yellow, green, purple, orange, magenta, teal, etc. This little fish has it.

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A really odd relationship under the sea

A really odd relationship under the sea

Pylopaguropsis mollymullerae

Researchers have described a new, beautiful species of Caribbean Pagurid hermit crab. The "Candy striped hermit crab" appears to have a symbiotic relationship with the most unexpected of animals: moray eels.

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Soft corals are underappreciated

I am as guilty as the next reefkeeper who shuns soft corals in favor of stony corals. But when I see a soft coral reef tank as beautiful as MikeC's aquarium, I'm forced to reevaluate my preferences.

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So who is producing all the vitamin B-12 in the oceans?

So who is producing all the vitamin B-12 in the oceans?

It's a big ocean. What is supplying it with vitamin B-12? Photo by Lara Torvi.

A research has concluded that cyanobacteria (e.g. Spirulina), previously thought to be the main supplier of B-12 in the oceans, actually produces a fake version of the vitamin. True B-12 is important to animal health, but who is making all the B-12 for sea life?

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Three new Brazilian killifish species

Three new Brazilian killifish species

Melanorivulus flavipinnis

Researchers have described three new Melanorivulus sp. killifish from the savannas of central Brazilian high plateaus. Meet Melanorivulus ignescens, M. flavipinnis, and M. regularis.

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Australia to introduce virus to kill invasive carp; Koi at risk

Australia to introduce virus to kill invasive carp; Koi at risk

Koi in Australia are susceptible to the planned herpes biocontrol agent to be released in 2018.

In an effort to eradicate invasive European carp, the Australian Government plans to introduce a herpesvirus into the environment at the end of 2018. The virus specifically targets only carps, but this means that Japanese koi are also susceptible to the virus.

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Aquatic Life Releases New EDGE Reef LED Aquarium Lights

Aquatic Life has released a reef version of their attractive, simple-to-program EDGE LED lights. The spectrum of the new light is designed with corals in mind; their relatively modest wattage (36" @ 48W and 48" @ 71W) make the EDGE Reef LED suitable primarily for LPS and soft corals or very shallow SPS reefs.

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The new Mississippi Aquarium in Downtown Gulfport

The new Mississippi Aquarium in Downtown Gulfport

An open campus-style layout is designed to take advantage of Gulfport's mild climate.

Details about the planned public aquarium were announced over the weekend. Instead of one large building, the relatively modest but beautiful aquarium is designed as an open campus spanning four main buildings with outdoor exhibits in between.

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Hygienic and safety reminder for all aquarists

Hygienic and safety reminder for all aquarists

Photo via Daily Mail

A recent report of a rare Mycobacterium marinum infection in an aquarist's lungs is a good excuse to remind all aquarists to practice safe, hygienic fishkeeping. Don't foget your aquarium is a chemical and biological soup.

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Ruby Seadragon seen live for the first time!

Phyllopteryx dewysea was described in 2015 based on trawled specimens from Western Australia. Scientists searched the deep waters off the Australian coastline in an attempt to film living Ruby Seadragons in their natural setting. In April 2016: success! This weekend, researchers published the first live video of the mythical seahorse.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bp5w4HjoaJM

Researchers at Scripps Oceanography and the Western Australian Museum capture on video the first-ever field sighting of the newly discovered third species of seadragon. As they observed two Ruby Seadragons on video for nearly 30 minutes, the scientists uncovered new details about their anatomy, habitat, and behavior.

The video shows the Ruby Seadragon is unique among seadragons in having a curled prehensile tail that is found on many Syngnathids (e.g. seahorses) but not on the two other seadragon species, the Weedy and Leafy Seadragons.  Ruby Seadragons likely use their tails to anchor themselves to the seafloor in strong currents or perhaps for some other yet-discovered purpose.

Also, unlike the Common and Leafy Seadragons, the Ruby Seadragon lives at far greater depth.  The video was recorded at over 164 feet deep by a mini-remotely-operated-vehicle.  The footage shows that unlike the lush habitats of the other seadragons, which are dominated by seagrasses and seaweeds, the Ruby Seadragon lives in a mixed reef and sandy habitat sparsely populated with macroalgae, seafans, corals, and sponges.  The water currents also appear very strong for Syngnathids.  Scientists really did not expect to find seadragons existing in this type of habitat.  Then again, no one thought we would discover a third, new seadragon species, the last species having been discovered 150 years ago.

The new research was published in Marine Biodiversity Records.

The intoxicating slow motion of LPS corals

This award-winning video reveals the psychedelic movements of corals as only time-lapse photography can capture. The four-minute video (composed of 25,000 photographs) features gorgeous LPS corals with cameos from zoas, clams, and feather duster worms.

Incredible indoor waterfall aquarium

In 2015, Dana Luebben said he "wanted to build an aquarium to host some fish and got a little carried away." The result? This magnificent indoor waterfall aquarium, which is the best use of an awkward staircase wall we've ever seen.

Stony corals suffer jet lag, too

Stony corals suffer jet lag, too

Apical branch fragments of Acropora eurystoma.

Like most organisms, corals and zooxanthallae have built-in circadian clocks. Research shows that if you change the lighting schedule, it can take corals some time to adjust their calcification to a new circadian rhythm.

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"Play dead," fishy

"Play dead," fishy

Photo by "Cassium" (C.C. 3.0)

Some fish have a strange and unexplained habit of lying perfectly still - sometimes on their sides or even their backs. It's a really fascinating behavior that is both entertaining and terrifying seen for the first time for an owner who thinks his fish is dying.

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One of the world's sexiest gobies ... is freshwater

One of the world's sexiest gobies ... is freshwater

Stiphodon anniaeae. (Photo: R. Hadiaty)

This is Stiphodon anniaeae. It may look saltwater, but this gaudy goby was only recently discovered (2014) on the rocky bottom of clear freshwater streams in Indonesia.

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