Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools
Log in
Sections
You are here: Home Blog

Blog

By admin - Posted Oct 26, 2009 09:10 PM

Cercamia melanogaster is your newest described cardinalfish

Cercamia melanogaster is your newest described cardinalfish

The Blackbelly Cardinalfish (M.V. Erdmann)

The new Apogonid is beautiful due as much to its colors as its lack of colors. C.melanogaster is recognizable for its striking pigmentation on its anterior half combined with its pigmentless, nearly transparent posterior half.

Read More…

Rambo, the Octographer

Rambo, the Octographer

Say "cheese!"

To entice visitors to contribute to conservation programs, Sea Life Aquarium (Auckland, New Zealand) has found a novel way to exploit octopus' ability to learn and perform tasks. They taught Rambo the octopus how to photograph aquarium patrons.

Read More…

Filipe Oliveira's newest aquascape

Filipe Oliveira's is a masterful aquascaper, and we always look forward to seeing his imagination at work. He uploaded a video of his latest aquascape: a gorgeous 3 week old 350 liter (90 gallon) planted aquarium. Who says a centered composition can't convey motion?

Flilpe describes his new aquascape on his youtube video page:


Setup:

  • Aquarium: 130x50x60cm (51x20x24 inches)
  • ELOS goods from ELOS The Aquarium Company:
  • Lighting System: ELOS Planet II 4x39w T5 (8h/day) + 2x70w HQI (2h/day)
  • Bottom System: ELOS AquaUno Capsules, TerraZero, BottomMineral and Terra Brown small
  • CO2: Pressurized CO2 with EV2000 (solenoid valve 24v) + CO2000 pressure reducer, REA50 (CO2 reactor)
  • Twinstar Nano from Twinstar Portugal


Aqvainnova Plants: (in vitro cup)

  • Echinodorus tenellus
  • Alternanthera reineckii 'Mini'
  • Eleocharis parvula
  • Hygrophila pinnatifida
  • Vesicularia montagnei 'Christmas'

 

Aquaflora plants:

  • Ludwigia arcuata
  • Vesicularia dubyana
  • Anubias nana mini
  • Cryptocoryne wendtii 'Green'
  • Echinodorus tenellus
  • Eleocharis aciculares
  • Hygrophila sp. 'Araguaia'
  • Juncus repens
  • Lilaeopsis 'Nova-Zealandiae'
  • Ludwigia sp 'Mini Super Red'
  • Microsorum pteropus ' Trident'
  • Pogostemon sp. 'Wicked!"
  • Pogostemon helferi

 

For more information about Filipe's aquarium projects, visit:

 

Filipe also recently posted a video update on Aquaflora's Red Bonsai Treescape aquarium, which we wrote about last year.  The tank has progressed beautifully into a whimsical living canvas of surreal colors and shapes.

Dokdo Tank: An upcoming affordable, high-tech nano reef system?

Dokdo Tank: An upcoming affordable, high-tech nano reef system?

From left to right: Dokdo Tank's Reef Monster LED, Sensor Voss, and Wave Plus.

Information about the Dokdo Tank is sketchy at best. From what we've gathered, a South Korean manufacturer plans to introduce a total nano reef system that includes prop pumps, hang-on sump (with protein skimmer), LED lights, and monitoring sensors – all controlled wirelessly.

Read More…

New rainbowfish really lives up to its name

New rainbowfish really lives up to its name

What a beauty! Photo by GW Lange.

Rainbowfish are beautiful fish, but let's face it; some species aren't quite as colorful as their common name suggests. Melanotaenia rubrovittata, the newest described species, lives up to its billing and then some.

Read More…

A Coral Love Story

A Coral Love Story is a short animated film produced by Reef Patrol to explain the unique coral restoration work of SECORE. It's like a reef version of the birds and the bees ... only with a few scientists involved.

SECORE is a non-profit organization dedicated to research, outreach, education, and large scale reef restoration which is unlike most reef restoration projects you may be familiar with.  Most restoration programs collect mature colonies, fragment them, let the fragments grow into small colonies (in underwater or topside nurseries), then transplant these colonies onto reef sites in need of restoration.

SECORE, on the other hand, goes out and collects coral gametes during mass broadcast spawning events when thousands of corals simultaneously release their eggs and sperm into the water. The scientists bring these gametes back into labs to fertilize and grow into new coral colonies before transplanting them back into the ocean.

This process is more complicated and intensive than the frag+grow+transplant method, but it boasts a benefit the latter can not: Increased genetic diversity of the restored reef site.  Instead of monogenetic clones populating a new site, SECORE's method produces genetically diverse coral specimens (and species as well), thus creating more natural restored reefs.  SECORE's method is essentially what Mother Nature intends to do on her own ... only with scientists giving her a helping hand to help offset the harm people have caused to our oceans.

In SECORE's labs, they're also learning the secrets behind corals reproduction, including better ways to get free-swimming coral larvae to settle onto hard substrate (one of the key steps to producing a new coral colony both in the lab and in the wild).

Anyhow, you came here for a cartoon and I gave you a mouthful.  Sorry.  Without further ado ...

Commercially Raised Clown Triggerfish available now

Commercially Raised Clown Triggerfish available now

Baby Clown Trigger!

Biota Marine Life Nursery (Palau) has successfully hatched and reared clown triggers (Balistoides conspicillum), and the first batch of captive raised specimens is now available through livestock wholesaler Quality Marine.

Read More…

Research finds reef fish can adjust for gender as oceans warm

UTS research has shown Spiny Chromis coral reef fish have the ability to compensate for the gender bias caused by rising ocean temperatures. While this is an important trait that could help constrain the impacts of ocean warming on reef fish populations and other species, there is a limit to this "transgenerational plasticity"

Read More…

Close-up of coral fluorescence in a reef lab

Dr. Tim Wijgerde shares with Advanced Aquarist this video of stony corals fluorescencing under blue light, including some time-lapse footage of neon SPS polyps contracting and expanding.

This video shows various scleractinian corals under narrow-bandwidth blue light, which excites the fluorescent proteins in the epidermis of the animals. Fluorescence is a phenomenon where an object absorbs light of a particular wavelength (colour), and emits it at another wavelength (colour). It is still not clear why corals produce fluorescent proteins, but it seems to protect them from harmful UV-radiation and excess (sun)light.

Using time-lapse, the contractile and expansion behaviour of coral polyps is also visualized in this video.

Advanced Aquarist Wallpaper: Harlequin Shake

Harlequin Shrimps (Hymenocera elegans) are some of the coolest, weirdest, most beautiful shrimps in the world. Here's a pair of loitering Harlequins photographed by Mitchell Brown.

Read More…

An elegant reef worm

Few if any of us appreciate the beauty of sea worms beyond the usual fan/feather duster varieties. The reality is many of us are freaked out by worms. We shouldn't be because some species are actually really darn neat and beautiful.

This is one of many species of syllid worm, a type of worm that crawls (yes, with little "feet") its way around sponges, ascidians, hydroids, bryozoa and algae, which they feed upon by piercing their sedentary prey's skins and sucking out the "life juice."

Granted, not all worms are beauty pageant contestents.  But you have to admit the stripped monochromatic pigmentation of this particular syllid is rather striking and its movement rather graceful.  Reef life is remarkable!

Video by liquidguru

That's some fancy woodworking on this 300 gallon aquarium!

That's some fancy woodworking on this 300 gallon aquarium!

I'm so fancy!

Currently up for bid on eBay is this 300 gallon glass aquarium with highly ornate custom pedestal cabinetry and full tank trim featuring fluted Corinthian columns.

Read More…

"Invasive" corals never looked so lovely

"Invasive" corals never looked so lovely

Simple and simply beautiful

Some reefkeepers don't keep corals like Xenia, GSP, and Montis because they grow too quickly and overtake entire reef tanks, while others simply don't view them as a challenge anymore. But these "weed corals" can be used to create beautiful and relatively carefree reef aquariums.

Read More…

Pseudojuloides polackorum: a new pencil wrasse

Pseudojuloides polackorum: a new pencil wrasse

Photo by Dennis Polack, the diver who first brought the undiscovered species to the scientists' attention and hence the fish was named after him and his wife, Sandy.

Allan Connell, Benjamin Victor, and John Randall have just described a new reef wrasse from the east coast of South Africa. The new pencil wrasse is a beauty and has already been available to hobbyist (albeit expensive and rare) thanks to the increasing collection of African reef fish (particularly Madagascar/Mauritius) in recent years.

Read More…

How Fish Eat

Another Friday is here. In case you haven't learned anything this week, here is an outstanding two-part episode by Smarter Every Day explaining the incredible mechanics behind how fish gobble things up, complete with some neato slow-mo video.

Document Actions

blog_sm.jpg

Contribute to our blogs!


Do you have news or discussion topics you want to see blogged?  Let us know!

 

ADVANCED AQUARIST