Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools
Log in
Sections
You are here: Home Blog

Blog

By admin - Posted Oct 26, 2009 09:10 PM

Another new dwarf goby; this time it's Eviota

Another new dwarf goby; this time it's Eviota

Eviota santanai

There's clearly a lot of new reef fish - and especially new dwarf gobies - out there waiting for science to discover. Last week, we reported on a beautiful new Trimma goby, Trimma helenae. T.helenae is not the only new goby species researchers have recently found. This is Eviota santanai.

Read More…

Toledo Zoo and Advanced Aquarist partnering for new Fish Health Q&A Column

We're excited to announce our partnership with Toledo Zoo to bring you a new magazine column. Jay Hemdal, Curator of Fishes and Invertebrates and Dr. Yousuf Jafarey, staff veterinarian will answer your questions about freshwater and saltwater fish health.

Read More…

Finding the right level of nutrients for corals

Finding the right level of nutrients for corals

Korean reefkeeper "Soolsool's" zeovit tank demonstrates what the proper balance of nutrient levels can achieve.

Scientists are studying what reefkeepers have also discovered. With the popularity of carbon dosing and technological advances in filtration, we now know water with too little nutrients can be just as harmful to corals as too much nutrients.

Read More…

An absurdly beautiful new Trimma goby

An absurdly beautiful new Trimma goby

Trimma helenae - the colors, man, the colors ...

Trimma helenae is a recently discovered and newly described dwarf goby from Raja Ampat, Indonesia. At only approximately one inch in length, this "tie-dyed" goby rivals any fish for the most colorful species we've seen.

Read More…

Planted tank eye candy

We haven't blogged eye candy in a while, and we've also neglected freshwater aquariums for too long. Sorry! To multitask, here are videos (one underwater!) of two splendid planted aquariums with diverging aquascaping philosophies.

The first aquarium uses nothing but plants to create its aquascape.  By carefully placing and pruning plants of varying colors and shapes, this aquascaper is able to "paint" an aquarium reminiscent of fine art.

The second aquarium uses plants and a wood and rock hardscape to create a scenery straight out of a Tolkien fantasy novel.  We even get to see the aquascape from a fish's point of view!  Man, we love when technology allows us to view our enclosed aquatic worlds in a totally fresh perspective.

The resilience of coral reefs

The resilience of coral reefs

Amazing rebirth of a reef wiped out by a bleaching event.

Dr. Bruce Carlson produced a wonderful video demonstrating the resilient capacity of coral reefs if humans would simply stop interfering with nature. It seems like common sense, but it's a lesson many people and governments have not taken to heart.

Read More…

Ecotech Marine merges with Aqua Illumination

Two venerable hi-tech aquarium manufacturers are joining forces. Ecotech Marine and Aqua Illuminations announced their merger this morning. Both brands will remain independent but the merger will allow opportunities for joint product development. We share their press release.

Read More…

An ode to the Tuxedo Urchin

An ode to the Tuxedo Urchin

A tuxedo urchin wearing a fancy "hat" as they customarily do. Photo by Bernard Dupont

If you're searching for a prolific marine algae grazer that feeds on almost every type of algae, is reef-safe, stays small, doesn't bulldoze, and is fairly hardy and long-lived, I present the tuxedo urchin for your consideration. Here is my tip of the hat to my favorite reef cleaner, Mespilia globulus!

Read More…

The coolest algae eater you can never own

Who wouldn't want a prehistoric-looking sea dragon to mow down your algae? Well, you can't have one. Though not quite dragon-esqe in size, marine iguanas still grow to 6 feet in length and are protected under local laws and CITES. We can always fantasize though.

Godzilla is a vegetarian

The marine iguana is the world's only marine lizard.  It cruises the waters around Galápagos Islands in search of algae to graze.  Seeing these reptiles swim with serpentine grace is an impressive sight to behold.  And just look at those monstrous claws that enable the iguanas to cling to rocks while it stuffs itself with algae!

Operation: Angelfish

Operation: Angelfish

The Scribbled Angelfish, all stitched up.

What do you do when a Scribbled Angelfish (Chaetodontoplus duboulayi) has a bowel obstruction? Marine breeder Chad Vossen saved his friend's fish with surgery. We share this inspiring story of true dedication for the fish we keep.

Read More…

February 2014 "Biggest Idiot" Award goes to ...

February 2014 "Biggest Idiot" Award goes to ...

Photo by FERDINAND EDRALIN

Eco-vandals who used chemicals to graffiti live coral at Kontiki Wall in Barangay Maribago, Philippines. The divers chemically burned their names on several large colonies of stony corals at the dive site.

Read More…

The ideal "fish" for the absentee fishkeeper

The ideal "fish" for the absentee fishkeeper

"Smart Fish Technology" ... we never thought we'd see this phrase coined.

A fish that you never have to feed, that never gets sick, that never dies ... obviously does not exist. But if you're cool with an artificial substitute, these free-swimming robotic fish could be the perfect "robostock" for the disengaged aquarist.

Read More…

"Diving" the Gilleleje Reef (Aquarium)

"Diving" the Gilleleje Reef (Aquarium)

Inside Gilleleje Reef (Denmark)

Dannish aquarist Peder Bjerge's "Gilleleje" reef is a living work of art. The latest video of his aquarium (produced by Dino Bit Siaras and published by Kenneth Olson) takes us up close and personal in as literal a way possible: underwater footage inside Peder's tank!

Read More…

Very deep cold water coral reef found off the Greenland coast

Very deep cold water coral reef found off the Greenland coast

Lophelia on board (Image credit: Bedford Institute of Oceanography)

Lophelia (commonly called eye-coral), like that seen in the depths of the Gulf of Mexico, was found by a Canadian research vessel on the Southern tip of Greenland. They were discovered when equipment for the vessel was tangled in the colony at approximately 3000 feet of depth.

Read More…

I bet your SPS won't grow this fast! [video]

I bet your SPS won't grow this fast! [video]

3D printed SPS!

An intrepid reef aquarist wanted some larger heads of coral in his tank, so he 3D printed two large SPS models for his display. Watch the time-lapse print after the jump.

Read More…

Document Actions

blog_sm.jpg

Contribute to our blogs!


Do you have news or discussion topics you want to see blogged?  Let us know!

 

ADVANCED AQUARIST