Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools
Log in
Sections
You are here: Home Blog

Blog

By admin - Posted Oct 26, 2009 09:10 PM

A contender for this year's "Lousy Idea" Award

Many of us have won goldfish at carnivals, and we've all played arcade claw/crane games (AKA UFO Catcher in Japan). Well, the Japanese have combined the two concepts with an arcade claw game where the prize is - get this - a live green spotted pufferfish.

So yeah ... this exists.

Juvenile Midori pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) are housed in small, sealed cups waiting for players to "catch" them. We can only hope that, at the very least, the fish are fed and given fresh water changes every day.

Why anyone would gamble money hoping to win cheap fish you can purchase at just about any LFS is beyond us.  Why anyone would think it's a good idea to make an arcade game that doubles as a public fish torture device is even more puzzling.  Yet, according to RocketNews24, this game is the next arcade fad in Japan.

It makes matters worse that Midori pufferfish aren't exactly ideal community fish for novices.  At least goldfish are dummy proof.

This is why we can't have nice things. Undecided

Really giant clams

The entire genus Tridacna is commonly referred to as giant clams, but most clams we see in the hobby (T.maxima, T.crocea, and T.deresa) are less than 12 inches, if even 4 inches. It's T.gigas that is the real champ of the Tridacnids.

Gigas clams can achieve over 48" (120cm) in length and weigh more than 600lbs (270kg).  Clams this massive act like little complete reef structures of their own, supporting entire mini ecosystems.  Isolated T.gigas have been found in the middle of otherwise barren sandy bottoms serving as "islands" for corals to anchor on their shells and recruitment sites for fish and invertebrates.  A reef aquascape designed around a giant T.gigas would make an unique and lovely exhibit.

Few aquarists have seen mature T.gigas.  Even the "big" specimens that sometimes enter our hobby are dwarfs compared to some of the 100+ year old behemoths found in the wild.  As a point of reference, Waikiki Aquarium's famous "Gigas-77" T.gigas is only a svelte 170lbs.  Or take a look at the video below of two monsters found on the Great Barrier Reef (2012).  Both clams have mature, beautiful Acroporids growing on their shells.

To learn more about Tridacna gigas, read James Fatherree's Advanced Aquarist article.

And no, these monsters don't trap nor eat people.

Natural zebrafish outcompete Glofish for mates

Natural zebrafish outcompete Glofish for mates

Glofish are genetically modified fish with a range of fluorescent pigmentation. Photo courtesy of Carolina Biological Supply Company

Researchers found that wild male zebrafish consistently beat out genetically modified Glofish for potential mates. Females wanted to mate with Glofish males, but wild males prevented it. Evolution is usually thought of in terms of "survival of the fittest, but the study shows that mating success is actually a stronger driving force.

Read More…

Fish born in larger groups develop more social skills and a different brain structure

Fish born in larger groups develop more social skills and a different brain structure

Neolamprologus pulcher (N. Pulcher) breed of cichlid fish used in the study Credit: Dario Josi

Fishkeepers have observed that captive-bred fish tend to be more sociable and less aggressive than their wild counterparts. A new research provides a possible explanation why.

Read More…

Octopus peek-a-boo

There is an amusing video making its rounds of an underwater photographer trying to snap a picture of an uncooperative Hawaiian octopus. There is an obvious reason why so many people ♥ octopus.

The Golden Passer Angelfish

The Golden Passer Angelfish

An one-of-a-kind aberrant Holacanthus passer

Meet El Dorado, the incredible amelanistic Holacanthus passer. This angelfish is virtually devoid of melanin, leaving it with only the brilliant golden coloration of its carotenoid pigments.

Read More…

New research reveals first warm-blooded fish

New research reveals first warm-blooded fish

This is an opah caught during a NOAA Fisheries survey off the California Coast. CREDIT: NOAA Fisheries/Southwest Fisheries Science Center

New research by NOAA Fisheries has revealed the opah, or moonfish, as the first fully warm-blooded fish that circulates heated blood throughout its body much like mammals and birds, giving it a competitive advantage in the cold ocean depths.

Read More…

The Blue Moon crayfish finally has a name

The Blue Moon crayfish finally has a name

Cherax pulcher are stunning!

The Cherax "Blue Moon" (AKA Hoa Creek) crayfish is one of the most beautiful tropical freshwater crustaceans. It started showing up in the aquarium trade circa early 2000s, but no one knew much about its origins. Scientists have finally located this crayfish in the wild and determined it is a new species: Cherax pulcher.

Read More…

Fish can produce their own sunscreen

Fish can produce their own sunscreen

Zebrafish, a favored research subject, are little chemical factories.

A new research has discovered that fish (at least zebrafish) are able to produce their own sunscreen when bombarded with UV light. Scientists want to learn if this discovery has human application. Regardless, we think it's neato that our fish friends can protect themselves from UV.

Read More…

The power of driftwood to lead the eye

Here are two beautiful aquascapes featuring gnarly driftwood projecting from both sides of the tank towards the middle to frame and add a lot of "movement" to their composition.

Malikov Igor

200 liter (52 gallon) Aquascape

Christopher Schlotmann

467 liter (124 gallon) Central American Aquascape

Chrysiptera caesifrons: A new reef damselfish

Chrysiptera caesifrons: A new reef damselfish

Chrysiptera caesifrons from Solomon Islands. Photo by G.R. Allen.

Chrysiptera caesifrons is the newest Pomacentrid species. What's most remarkable about the damselfish isn't its appearance or behavior but rather how wide its natural range is and that it has only now been described.

Read More…

Feeding Acropora helps them handle elevated temperatures and CO2

Feeding Acropora helps them handle elevated temperatures and CO2

Click on the image for a larger and clearer version of the infographic.

A new research by the UM Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science finds that staghorn corals fed dried zooplankton were able to sustain normal growth at elevated temperatures and CO2. Studies like this further reinforce the importance of coral nutrition in the wild and in captivity - a subject Advanced Aquarist has covered extensively in recent months.

Read More…

This crazy pleco can scale vertical walls!

Loricariids aren't known for death-defying antics; fact is, they live a very unexciting sedentary lifestyle. But this pleco, Chaetostoma microps, was recorded climbing up and down a vertical wall in an Ecuadorian cave ... using its sucker-mouth!

Here is a video of the pleco doing its best Spiderman impersonation.  Water is cascading down the nearly vertical wall, making the climb that much more impressive and also explains how this catfish survives above the water.  This is the first time scientists have documented this activity.  The behavior seems to defy any practical or survival purpose.

A crab that burrows in your brain has been identified

A crab that burrows in your brain has been identified

If you see craters like these in your stony corals, there's a good chance there's a gall crab in there.

Sorry for the click-bait title. We couldn't resist. A new species of gall crabs that lives inside open brain corals, Trachyphyllia geoffroyi, has just been described.

Read More…

A new twilight zone anthias from Pohnpei

A new twilight zone anthias from Pohnpei

Luzonichthys seaver holotype. Photo by Brian Greene

Luzonichthys seaver is a newest described anthias hailing from very deep waters at Pohnepei, Micronesia. No photo of a living specimen currently exists, but the preserved holotype shows a supremely colorful fish, which many super deep water reef fish are.

Read More…

Document Actions

blog_sm.jpg

Contribute to our blogs!


Do you have news or discussion topics you want to see blogged?  Let us know!

 

ADVANCED AQUARIST