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By admin - Posted Feb 14, 2011 10:00 PM
Below is a comprehensive listing of our latest blog posts sorted by date with the newest posts at the top of the list.
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Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium hopes to breed WHALE SHARKS

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Yup! The Japanese public aquarium is hoping to be the first to not only breed whale sharks in captivity but also the first to ever observe the mating and breeding behavior of these mysterious ocean giants.

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Surreal! Art blending freshwater fish with coral reefs

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In vibrant and dreamlike paintings, Portland artist Lisa Ericson "hybridizes" tropical freshwater fish with coral reef imagery. Her work is meticulous, creative, and simply stunning.

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Green Star Polyp Fields Forever

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Some reefkeepers may consider GSP pests because they spread so quickly. And the GSP in this aquarium has certainly taken over. But with results this beautiful, why wouldn't you let them dominate the aquascape?

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The noble work of coral reef restoration

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Coral reefs around the world are under siege, and scientists are fighting the good fight to repair them. SECORE shares with Advanced Aquarist a detailed overview of reef restoration: its present day techniques, limits and challenges, as well as opportunities for the future.

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A new Silver Dollar species

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Myloplus lucienae is a new species of "silver dollar" (AKA Myleus, AKA pacu) from Brazilian Amazon. While resembling piranhas (also of the family Serrasalmidae), Myloplus are peaceful but voracious herbivores.

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The hardiest fish in the world?

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The Atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus (AKA Mummichog) is a North American fish that not only can survive highly variable salinity, temperature fluctuations from 6 to 35 °C (43 to 95 °F), and nearly anoxic (oxygen-less) water, but can withstand toxic levels 8,000 times more lethal than other fish can survive.

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Guppies can distinguish quantity – some better than others

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Guppies can't count exact numbers like people and a few animals (e.g. African grey parrots) can. But they do possess the ability to discern "more" vs "less," and some guppies are better at this skill than others.

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Two new lovely deep-reef basslets

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Meet Lipogramma haberi and Lipogramma levinsoni, the two newest basslets found on extremely deep Curaçao reefs in the Caribbean.

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A hot mess

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Sometimes unkempt equals beautiful. Precise aquascaping styles like Iwagumi, Nature, and Dutch are clearly impressive, but sometimes simply letting your plants run wild can also turn into striking aquariums.

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Acroporas "live" much longer than previously thought

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A study has found the oldest genotypes of Acropora palmata (elkhorn corals) are over 5,000 years old. Put another way: reefkeepers can still be trading the same frag genes of today's "designer corals" many millennia from now.

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"Dead" fish comes back alive while being flushed

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We've all made mistakes with the care of our fish, but this fishkeeper may take the prize for the most successive number of tragic errors. And she recorded the entire ordeal.

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Let's talk about sponge filters

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No; not that kind of sponge filter. I want to talk about living sponges. These sedentary animals may look passive, but they are anything but. Their active water pumping mechanism is really impressive.

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A new species of tiny goby that lives in tunicates

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Lubricogobius tunicatus is a new Indo-Pacific dwarf goby (mature size of about 0.4"/1cm) that lives inside the oral or incurrent siphons of tunicates – just another fascinating symbiosis found on reefs.

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Mediterranean sun corals have an interesting method of reproduction

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About three quarters of coral species broadcast spawn (eggs and sperm) into the water for external fertilization. Fewer corals fertilize internally, brooding "baby corals" (scientists call these planulae) before "giving birth." Mediterranean sun corals are one such coral, and their way of giving birth is even more rare and weird.

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Why fish send red signals in the deep blue sea

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Some of us think that reef fish can't see the color red because red light is quickly filtered out by seawater. But then why are so many reef fish fluorescence red? Studies are showing that reef fish not only see red, but the color serves very different purposes for different fish.

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